What’s New In CSS?

Rachel hooks us up with what the CSS Working Group is talking about:

  • Styling scrollbars. This would come with properties like scrollbar-width and scrollbar-color. The best we have right now is proprietary WebKit stuff.
  • Aspect ratios. I imagine the CSS portion of this journey will be best handled if it plays nicely with the HTML intrinsicsize stuff.
  • Matching without specificity. :where() is :matches() with no specificity, and :matches() may become :is().
  • Logical Properties shorthand. The team is discussing a shorthand syntax for Logical Properties and the possibility logical would be default over the current physical with a defined "mode" in the stylesheet.

Understanding React Render Props and HOC

Here’s a great post by Aditya Agarwal on the difference between render props and higher-order components in React. I particularly like the demo he chose to explain the two. But, to summarize:

Higher-order components (HOCs) take a component and return a component. So let’s say you have a component called Username that just returns a string of a user’s name and you want to capitalize that somewhere – this is the perfect opportunity to use a HOC that wraps that Username component and changes each character. Just like the excellent tutorial Kingsley Silas wrote up here on CSS-Tricks.

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Symbolic Links for Easier Multi-Folder Local Development

You know how you open a "project" in a local code editor? I guess different editors have different terminology for it, but essentially what you are doing is opening a folder/directory and it shows you a sidebar full of files and folders you can navigate through and such.

Typically there is one parent folder, and everything else is within that folder. Right? Well, it doesn't have to be! That's where symbolic links come in.

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monday.com, a new way to manage your work! Meet the new visual project management tool

monday.com is a centralized platform for teams to manage every detail of their work, from high-level roadmap planning to the specifics of day-to-day tasks, while building a culture of transparency. It is a tool for an any-sized team, which can start with two freelancers working together to thousands collaborating across the globe. The tool is really popular amongst non-tech teams, often replacing burdensome excel files, whiteboards, and excessively long meetings.

The main thing is that it’s not limited to tech companies, it is used by churches, construction companies, schools and universities, startups, fortune 500 companies including WeWork, Samsung, Discovery Channel, Wix, NBC, General Assembly, McDonalds, Uber, Wix, AOL, and Adidas. Currently, it has over 22,000 paying teams.

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Subset Numerals so They’re as Awesome as the Rest of Your Content

You’re putting the finishing touches on your new million-dollar-idea — your copy is perfect, your color scheme is dazzling, and you’ve found a glorious font pairing (who knew Baskerville and Raleway looked so great together? You did.) but there’s one problem: Raleway’s pesky lowercase numbers make your shopping cart look confusing and overwhelm the user.

This is a fairly mundane problem, but an issue that can make beautiful typefaces unusable if numbers are an important part of your site; a store or an analytics dashboard for example. And this isn’t just an issue with lowercase numerals. Non-monospaced numerals can be equally distracting when glancing at a list of numbers.

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Emphasizing Emphasis

I think Facundo Corradini is right here in calling out our tweet. If you're italicizing text because it should be styled that way (e.g. using italics to display a person's internal thought dialog, as illustrated in our example), then that's an <i> and not an <em>, because <em> is for stress emphasis — as in, a word you would emphasize with your voice, if spoken, to affect meaning.

Plus, I'm always down for long-form articles about the nuances of a handful of HTML elements!

Styled Payment Forms with Wufoo

Thanks so much to Wufoo for the support of CSS-Tricks! Wufoo is a form builder where you can quickly build forms of any complexity. From simple contact forms to multi-page logic-riddled application forms that sync to Salesforce and handle site-integrated exit surveys, it handles lots of use cases!

There is another powerful feature of Wufoo: taking payments. it's especially worth knowing about, in my opinion, because of how affordable it is. It's essentially eCommerce without costing you any fees on top of your paid Wufoo account and payment processing fees. Not to mention you can integrate them into your own site and style them however you like.

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The Three Types of Performance Testing

We've been covering performance quite a bit — not just recently, but throughout the course of the year. Now, Harry Roberts weighs in by identifying three types of ways performance can be tested.

Of particular note is the first type of testing:

The first kind of testing a team should carry out is Proactive testing: this is very intentional and deliberate, and is an active attempt to identify performance issues.

This takes the form of developers assessing the performance impact of every piece of work they do as they’re doing it. The idea here is that we spot the problem before it becomes problematic. Prevention, after all, is cheaper than the cure. Capturing performance issues at this stage is much more preferable to spotting them after they’ve gone live.

I think about this type of performance all the time when I’m working on a team, although I’ve never had a name for it.

I guess what I’m always thinking about is how can we introduce front-end engineers into the design process as early as possible? I’ve found that the final product is much more performant in when front-end engineers and designers brainstorm solutions together. Perhaps collaborating on a performance checklist is a good place to start?

Sign Up vs. Signup

Anybody building a site in that requires users to create accounts is going to face this language challenge. You'll probably have this language strewed across your entire site, from prominent calls-to-action in your homepage hero, to persistent header buttons, to your documentation.

So which is correct? "Sign Up" or "Signup"? Let's try to figure it out.

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